“Ancestry DNA Matches: Who Are All of these People, and Why Do I Care?”, by Wendy Dillenschneider

Jan 20 2018 topic:  Ancestry DNA Matches: Who Are All of these People, and Why Do I Care?, by Wendy Dillenschneider

Targeted at the amateur and professional genealogist, AncestryDNA has the largest consumer database of autosomal DNA test results in the world. Over 3 million people have tested with AncestryDNA. They are leaders in the use of combined genetic and genealogical data to predict the ancestor that you have in common with another individual. AncestryDNA does not offer a chromosome browser, so genealogists must use tree triangulation to discover common ancestors. AncestryDNA provides several tools to help you with your tree triangulation work.
  •  AncestryDNA Results – what are they, how to interpret and evaluate them
  •  DNA Matches including Shared Ancestors and Pedigree & Surnames
  •  New Ancestor Discoveries
  •  DNA Circles
  •  Using tree triangulation to identify ancestors
  •  Tips and tricks for discovering your ancestors and working with matches
  •  Case studies and stories!

BIO

Wendy Dillenschneider began tracing her family tree 35 years ago when she was living in Munich, Germany. She figured that “Dillenschneider” had to be a German name, so she started looking up the name in phone books at the post office. She didn’t find any family in Germany, but she finally located them in Alsace.  Decades later, working out of her ranch on the western slopes of Pikes Peak, Wendy has extended her family tree using online resources for both domestic and foreign research. She is adept at research in Pennsylvania, where her family settled in the United States. She is collaborating with a cousin in Alsace to trace the migration of Dillenschneiders from Alsace to America.
Wendy and her husband, Greg, added genetic genealogy or DNA testing to their genealogy toolkit in 2013 and have since immersed themselves in the details of DNA tests and evaluation methods. They have answered several questions about their family history using DNA evidence.